COPY OF

Before and After

Example #5: Peter has written some very funny songs for a very funny musical.  He can write musical notation and has a certain amount of facility with Finale but not enough to do a full-blown arrangement.  [Or something]

He writes a song he gives me either a pencil & paper sketch or a Finale file of melody, lyrics, and a basic feel, and I take it from there—standardizing the feel, adjusting chords [completely destroying his work in the process...blah..blah]

 

BEFORE

Click the image below to hear the Finale program play Peter's [original/raw] sketch.

I put in a [halting] ["sneaky"] feel up front, as Robert checks the room for any hidden relatives.  A steady, relaxed tempo kicks in as he becomes convinced that, at last, he's truly alone and the number gradually begins to morph into a dance number.  The feel changes as often as his action changes, and the entire arrangement builds to a triumphant "big finish."

Click the image below to watch my arrangement go by:

[Click the image below to hear and view ...]—

After ARRANGEMENT BY ALBERT

 Example #4: One morning in 1975, George Cavender, the director of the Michigan Marching Band, told me he'd heard our tubas musically prodding Michigan hockey fans into shouting a time-honored UM cheer.

 

Professor Cavender sang for me the bass line he'd heard, and that afternoon the full band rehearsed my resulting arrangement—Let's Go Blue!—for the very first time.

 

BEFORE

After ARRANGEMENT BY ALBERT

Click the image below to hear [a re-enactment of] Professor Cavender explaining to me what he wanted, on the Fall morning long ago.

Disclaimer:

"Not Professor Cavender's actual voice, but

An Incredible Simulation!"

To that bass line I added a melody, harmony, countermelodies, and a rhythmic underpinning. I also gave it a longer structure, to allow time for 100,000+ noisy fans to notice that the band was playing (I'm always thinking "practical").

Click the image below to hear my arrangement:

 

Example #5: Peter has written some very funny songs for a very funny musical.  He can write musical notation and has a certain amount of facility with Finale but not enough to do a full-blown arrangement.  [Or something]

He writes a song he gives me either a pencil & paper sketch or a Finale file of melody, lyrics, and a basic feel, and I take it from there—standardizing the feel, adjusting chords [completely destroying his work in the process...blah..blah]

Click the image below to hear the Finale program play Peter's [original/raw] sketch.

I put in a [halting] ["sneaky"] feel up front, as Robert checks the room for any hidden relatives.  A steady, relaxed tempo kicks in as he becomes convinced that, at last, he's truly alone and the number gradually begins to morph into a dance number.  The feel changes as often as his action changes, and the entire arrangement builds to a triumphant "big finish."

Click the image below to watch my arrangement go by:

 Example #3 Coming soon…

BEFORE

Click the image below

to listen to Carolyn communicating

one of her songs to me—

Example #?: An experienced composer, performer and teacher, Carolyn writes songs for her young Brooklyn students to learn in the classroom and perform at their programs.

She usually gives me a leadsheet and a recording of herself singing the melody, playing a piano accompaniment, and coaching me with further instructions, suggestions and requests.  I transcribe the melody, accompaniment and any additional singing parts, and then edit and arrange as needed.  I often "standardize" her piano style and notate it at a "medium" level of difficulty.